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DuPage County divorce lawyer petition discovery trialThere are two types of divorce cases: contested and uncontested. An uncontested divorce is one in which the spouses are able to come to an agreement about property division, parental responsibilities, parenting time, spousal support, and any other issues that must be resolved before their marriage can be dissolved. If the spouses cannot reach an agreement about one or more of these issues, they enter into a contested divorce. Read on to learn about the typical steps involved in an Illinois contested divorce and how you can get the legal support you need during this process.

Filing a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage

The first step in the Illinois divorce process is filing a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage with your county circuit court. The person who files the divorce Petition is called the petitioner, and the other spouse is referred to as the respondent. When you file for divorce, you have a legal obligation to notify the respondent. You may do this in person, via certified mail, or through a deputy sheriff. The respondent must respond to the petition within 30 days, and he or she may file a response to the petition or a counter-petition.

Discovery

The term “discovery” is used to refer to the divorce phase in which spouses and their lawyers gather information about income, assets, child-related issues, and other matters relevant to the divorce case. This process may include financial disclosures, requests for production, interrogatories, admissions of facts, and depositions. The exchange of such information will ensure that both parties have the facts necessary to support their claims and arguments during a contested divorce.

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Posted on in Divorce

DuPage County divorce attorneysEvery year, thousands of American couples make the difficult decision to get a divorce. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that approximately 800,000 divorces occur throughout the United States on an annual basis. While some divorces can be a seamless transition into a new life for both partners, some divorces can be contested. Divorce settlements are routinely complicated by issues such as child custody, resource allocation, and division of property.

If you believe that your former spouse is likely to contest you on any number of issues, it is important to be prepared. Most importantly, it is critical to partner with a legal representative that is eager to fight for your best interest.

Potential Contentious Issues

While no divorce is the same, there are a number of issues of contention that are commonly fought for during a divorce settlement. Listed below are a few issues that may arise during your divorce:

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Divorce is rarely easy, and it is not typically something that people want to endure. Still, it is sometimes necessary to ensure the happiness of both parties. So, while some spouses may experience initial resistance when they ask for a divorce, the matter is typically resolved with time. What happens, though, when the issue does not resolve, and a spouse refuses to sign the divorce papers? Are you then stuck in your marriage, or are there other strategies you can employ? Rest assured: divorce may still be an option; it may just look a little different than you expected.

Why Some Spouses Refuse to Sign

There are many reasons why a spouse might refuse to sign divorce papers. Some strongly believe in the sanctity of marriage, either because of religion or how they were raised. Others may fear judgment from their family, friends, or professional and social circles. Then there are some who refuse to sign because they are struggling to come to terms with the end of their marriage, and they may even experience so much anger and bitterness that they use their refusal as a form of retaliation. Still, there are some who have a history of emotional, physical, mental, financial, or sexual abuse and they may refuse to sign so they can maintain control over the victim.

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